Surface Design Association Inspires Explore Fiber

This is my Pecha Kucha presentation (with the text) that I presented at the Surface Design Associations’ 40th anniversary conference 4/3 – 4/6/2017. Find out how receiving an SDA scholarship to attend the 2011 Minneapolis conference planted the seed for the creation of http://www.ExploreFiber.com

Art Education – The Challenges of Curriculum Transition

This presentation examines a school district’s Art I Foundation curriculum change into the Understanding by Design curriculum template. Find out the challenges and successes for this National Art Education Association annual conference in New York City March 2017.

Bring Fibers Into Your Art Curriculum

See examples of art educators in the Plano Independent School District using fibers in their art projects. This presentation gives not just examples, but advice and resources to support including fibers in the classroom. Resources include the website Explorefiber.com, the blog of Cassie Stephens, and the fiber course of The Art of Education.

Process Over Product in Art Education: A Student Centered Approach to Making Art

Living in the 21st century is living in a time when change is rapid and insistent.  It can be difficult to keep up with  constant change, much less embrace and incorporate it into our teaching practices.  My experience as an art teacher has always been at the high school level in a public school setting.  My school is highly diverse in every way – racially, culturally, economically, religiously, and with a high percentage of students with special needs.  It is challenging teaching so many kinds of children while striving to target their individual needs!  More than challenging, it can lead to a high level of frustration for both teacher and student!  I know my experience is not unique – this is the common landscape of art classrooms across the country.  When teachers get together, they talk about these common problems and wonder how we can reach our students when we feel like art can be at the heart of their individual expression.

Art education, just like education in general, is also in a state of flux.  Decades of teaching centered on a teacher driven, studio techniques curriculum does not engage the majority of students taking beginning art classes.  The teacher is faced with apathy, defiance and push back as the students query their teacher about why they should do it.  It’s not that what we’ve been doing for the last 20 or 30 years is wrong, it’s just that we need to think about what we’re doing with a new lens, adapting our pedagogy to incorporate not only technology, but the mindset of the digital natives that we are teaching.

My presentation reflects my own journey as an art educator over the last 10 years.  I have been exposed to many ideas, techniques, strategies and approaches to teaching art.  When new ideas come my way, I have taken them immediately into the classroom and played with them with my students, and I have been very transparent with them about why we try these new methods or vocabularies – I want them to care about the art they make!

The lesson plan format I present here is the culmination of my own teaching experience.  I have created an outline that put teaching studio techniques not at the front of the lesson, but is woven throughout the art making process.  What comes at the beginning of my students’ experience is investigation, exploration, questioning and journaling to connect to their own discoveries and their personal lives.  The art that results from this approach is more authentic and not formulaic like many “art projects” can turn out to be.  They have more motivation and excitement in their creating.  And, they are more involved in the assessment of their project because I have shifted my grading to assessing their effort and persistence instead of how skilled their end product is.  My students like being graded this way and I do to.  We are slowly changing from an art classroom to an art community, where their voice, ideas and creations are celebrated and valued as unique expressions.

After viewing the presentation above, here are some questions to consider about your own experience teaching, or how you think you will incorporate some of these ideas when you begin teaching:

  1. Have you ever been a part of a class in which the instructor used a questioning strategy –like QFT or artful thinking?  If so, did it deepen your understanding or connection to what you were learning?  Tell us about your experience and how you would incorporate questioning strategies into your own teaching.
  1. Do you think students can produce high quality artwork if they are focused on the process instead of the product?  This lesson plan emphasizes discovery and investigation instead of teacher driven instruction about processes and techniques.  How would you fold in studio technique instruction into a lesson plan that emphasizes students driving their own learning?
  1. In many art experiences, reflection and assessment come at the completion of the art project instead of throughout the process. Identify at least three types of assessment tools you would use with your students and how you might weave them into a process over product lesson plan format.

I welcome your thoughts and would love to hear your comments!

Artist of the Day Video Student Reflection

Video photo

I’ve been using Artist of the Day videos as an opening activity in my high school art classes for several years now.  I have noticed changes in the quality of the videos as well as trends, such as artists using more technology in developing their artwork.  Everything about our lives change constantly and rapidly, so I felt a need to check in with my students to see what they think about the Artist of the Day videos I show them.  I asked 120 students four questions and will list some of their short answer responses here.

The thing I like most about Artist of the Day is:

  • You get to see different types of art and new creations (47 students wrote answers that were very similar to this.  This is definitely one of the goals I have with the videos.)  The rest of the responses have varying numbers of responses.
  • It’s unique
  • I like the people and their personality
  • Expands your imagination and brings out new ideas
  • It’s a good way to escape
  • Getting inspired before every class
  • It inspires me
  • I get to relax at the beginning of the class
  • You don’t know what you are going to see next (As the instructor, I select the videos I show, but I do show videos the students find as well.)
  • I notice more artsy stuff!

Artist of the Day helps me:

  • Get ideas and inspire me
  • With creativity
  • Learn
  • Understand artists’ point of view about their work
  • Discover new artists and types of art
  • Think outside the box
  • Relax and let my brain move away from all of the academics
  • Forget about bad things throughout my day (that’s a nice side benefit!)
  • Get into the mood of art
  • Get through the hump of my day and get the creative part of my brain going
  • See things differently

Artist of the Day is Fun because:

  • I get to see different forms of art
  • It shows imagination and ideas I never thought of
  • The videos we watch are really cool
  • It’s cool and interesting
  • It’s different from the things I do in my other classes
  • It isn’t focused on educating us/more about exploring a new world of art
  • It makes you feel happy for some apparent reason ( 🙂 I love this – it makes me happy!  I get to see the video 6 times a day!!!)
  • You see real life, current applications of art
  • It shows that people enjoy art
  • I get to see things I wouldn’t normally see
  • We get a break before we start learning
  • It’s something I look forward to

I wish Artist of the Day was:

  • It’s fine as it is (a lot of students responded this way.  The videos are usually between 2-5 minutes long.)
  • Longer (as many said they wished it was longer!  A few wished it was shorter, but I think they are about the right length so they don’t cut into too much studio time.)
  • ME!
  • More about music and dance
  • More about technology
  • More about the artist and how they work
  • Something teens would like more (need to drill down to get specific information about this.)
  • On the school website so we could see them whenever.  (This is something I need to work on – putting them up on my class pages.)
  • All class long because they have cool information
  • Something to try to gain new experiences (Also something to get more information about.)

I have an article that is going to be published in an art education journal next month about how to use these videos.  If the reader wants to get more in depth information about the Artist of the Day Videos, email me and I’ll send the article to you when it comes out.  In the meantime, I asked my student teacher, Melissa Backus from Texas Woman’s University what she thought about the Artist of the Day Videos.  Here’s what she said…

AoD Videos are kind of magical – at a basic level, they get students to focus and get settled into class.  On another level, they expose students to a variety of formal and self-taught contemporary artists, and a variety of mediums and styles of art.  These videos also help create dialogue in the classroom, separate from the main project or topic, about contemporary art and artists.  Ultimately, the videos give students the chance to see art they probably won’t see anywhere else (unless they actively searched for it!).

Playing with the videos to help connect my students to making and appreciating art brings me a great deal of pleasure.  Though a small fraction had some complaint about the videos, the vast majority wrote positive things about our daily art exploration.  We all discover the wonders of the art world in our classroom and are transported by their beauty and genius – every day!

Breaking Out of My Curriculum Box

Breaking Out of the Box

Last summer I looked at all of my curriculum and created a new foundation for my instruction.  I am calling the components “cornerstones” because I want them to be solid building blocks for my students’ lessons.  This first week of school I introduced them to the Studio Thinking Habits of Mind: develop craft, engage & persist, envision, express, observe, reflect, stretch & explore, and understand the art world.  I want these habits of mind to be second nature to all of us.  I told my students today that I want them to think of themselves as artists coming into a shared art studio, not just going to “art class”.  Hopefully, by working on incorporating these habits of mind into their work all year, they will be more engaged and excited about their artwork by thinking and feeling like a real artist.

I am also introducing my lessons using Big Ideas and Artistic Problems.  These are enduring ideas that all people share all over the world, and I hope by giving them a springboard of enduring ideas, this will also lead them to making more meaningful art.  One of the books we used in a previous course, Teaching Meaning in Artmaking, gave a great foundation for building Big Ideas into the art lesson.  And finally, something I learned from a colleague in my graduate class last semester, the Question Formulation Technique, is the final cornerstone.  I want to teach my students to generate their own essential questions about their art making before they begin their project.  By giving them more independence in guiding their art making, I hope that the art they create really matters to them!

Resources:

Hetland, L., Winner, E., Veenema, S., & Sheridan, K. (2013) Studio thinking: the real benefits of visual arts education, second edition.  New York, NY: Teachers College Press; Reston, VA: National Art Education Association.

The Right Question Institute.  Retrieved from:  http://rightquestion.org/education/

Walker, S. (2001) Teaching Meaning in Artmaking. Worcester, MA: Davis Publications, Inc.